My next few blogs are going to explore some of the concepts, taken from our training modules, that are most effective in developing a veterinary business. 

Some years ago I came across the science and art of great recommendations. As with any idea that sounds plausible, I tried it out. I had a healthy degree of scepticism - some new ideas work out well, others are tried and abandoned pretty sharply. This is the one most impressive change I have ever made in my consulting technique. 

Veterinary online trainingThe art of recommendation
A good recommendation massively increases client compliance with veterinary advice. In a research paper which looked at compliance after advice to undertake dental or surgical procedures for their pet, a good recommendation was found to lead to a 7-fold increase in compliance!  And it isn't just vets who can use this technique - it applies equally well to sales of food or toys, or to receptionists wanting to encourage clients to make an appointment. 


Training staff to give a good and clear recommendation gives a win-win-win situation.

The pet receives best quality care
The client knows they are doing the best for the pet
The business benefits from increased income and increased client satisfaction

What comprises a good recommendation?

  • A good recommendation is clear and unambiguous 
  • It is delivered with sincerity and enthusiasm
  • It includes a discussion of the benefits to the pet (as opposed to factual details of the advised item or procedure)
  • It uses the magic phrase 'I recommend'


An example:
'Rover's teeth are caked in tartar. We could do a scale and polish if you like, which is a procedure done under a general anaesthetic. First we remove all the tartar then we polish the teeth'. 

Higher compliance would be achieved if the wording was better:
'Rover has tartar build up on his teeth. I recommend we perform a dental scale and polish under a general anaesthetic. This will solve the bad odour on his breath, and reduce the chance of tooth loss in the coming years. It also gives us a chance to examine his teeth thoroughly to be sure there is no painful dental disease present'

If you aren't already giving great recommendations, give it a try - I'd love to know how you get on! 

Feel free to copy this to your practice team if recommendation training is not already taking place. It may be the one biggest boost your business gets this year.

 

Happy Training!

 

Best wishes,
 
Liz, and all the team